Faciō

The essential verb faciō, facere, fēcī, factum, is generally regular, though features a few variant forms you may not have known, and a distinct set of rules for compounds which you may have always ‘sensed’ but never understood.

Exceptional Features

The two exceptional features of faciō are its imperative singular (just the fac, ma’am—not face, which sounds like a Canadian swearing), and its passive forms, derived from fīō (to be discussed in a later post).

Faciō also features a variant future perfect faxō (in place of the more common fēcerō) and a variant perfect subjunctive faxim (in place of the more common fēcerim).

Compound Rules

Compounds of faciō (i) replace a with i and (ii) replace the supine -actum with –ectum, and while retaining the -iō declension, sometimes they feature passive forms that are not derived from fīō.

  • cōnficiō, cōnficere, cōnfēcī, cōnfectum (finish)
  • cōnficior, cōnficī, cōnfectus sum (die) [but note that ‘ficior’ is not a word!]
  • afficiō, afficere, affēcī, affectum (affect)
  • afficior, afficī, affectus sum (be affected
  • inficiō, inficere, infēcī, infectum (dye, poison)
  • inficior, inficī, infectus sum (be poisoned)

Relation to PIE

For those interested in the topic discussed in the last post, the Latin faciō is derived from the PIE dʰeh₁, which also produced τίθημι, do, and (the German) tun.

The Essential AG: 204, 204a

3 comments on “Faciō

  1. sbmassey says:

    I fail to see any relation between faciō versus dʰeh₁, τίθημι, do, and tun. How can it be so-derived?

    • rsmease says:

      http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/facio

      Here’s my source, and while I admit I’m not sure how an aspirated alveolar voice stop could become a labiodental aspirate, I’m not one to disagree with Wiktionary. The movement from dʰeh₁ to τίθημι/etc. is much more manageable, because ‘t’ and ‘d’ are phonetically quite similar. If there are any readers (sbmassey?) more versed in historical linguistics, I would love to have the matter revealed.

      • Steve Massey says:

        I’m as amateur as they come in any kind of linguistics, but Wikipedia is the source of all knowledge, and this link seems to describe what the pro’s are thinking:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Latin#Aspirates

        “The Indo-European voiced aspirates bʰ, dʰ, gʰ, gʷʰ, which were probably breathy voiced stops, first devoiced in initial position (fortition), then fricatized in all positions, producing pairs of voiceless/voiced fricatives in Proto-Italic: f ~ β, θ ~ ð, χ ~ ɣ, χʷ ~ ɣʷ respectively.[9] The fricatives were voiceless in initial position”

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