Ablative of Price and Genitive of Quantity

The price of something is put in the ablative case.

  • He sold the land for money: agrum pecūniā vendidit.
  • Jokes: who wants them for a dinner: logōs rīdiculōs: quis cēnā poscit?

The ablative of price is similar to the ablative of penalty, as it is ultimately an (adverbial) ablative of material, describing the compositional means by which an exchange is achieved.


What you’ll see as often or more often than the ablative of price are similar genitive words indicating indefinite value.

  • It is of great importance to me: mihi magnī interest.
  • That doesn’t matter to me: illud parvī mihi rēfert.
  • The cloak is worthy a great deal to me: amiculum mihi tantī est.
  • I care nothing for this color: istum colōrem nīlī (or nihilī) pendō.

Common words with the genitive of value: magnī, parvī, tantī, quantī, plūris, minōris, nihilī/nīlī, assis, floccī.

(floccī is ‘of a lock of wool.’)

  • I care not a straw: nōn floccī pendō.

The verbs of buying and selling:

  • concilio, conciliāre, conciliāvī, conciliātus: to buy
  • parō, parāre, parāvī, parātus: to buy
  • redimō, redimere, redēmī, redemptus: to buy back
  • vendō, vendere, vendidī, venditus: to sell
  • dō, dāre, dedī, datus: to give, sell

For more on intersum and rēferō:

https://latinforaddicts.wordpress.com/2012/03/15/thats-interesting/

The Essential AG: 416-17

Greek Nouns (in Latin) of the Second Declension

Consider this a sequel to my earlier post on Greek Nouns (in Latin) of the First Declension: http://wp.me/p2eimD-aX

  • As with “Greek” first-declension nouns, these second-declension nouns decline like their regular Latin counterparts in the plural
  • Like the Greek second declension, nouns are by-and-large masculine or feminine
  • For the singular, they decline more regularly than the first-declension nouns. Have a look:

So, a few things:

  • These correspond more or less identically corresponding second-declension Greek nouns, with the genitive -ου rendered as the regular Latin -ī and dative -ῳ rendered as -ō
  • The exception here is Athōs, which declines more like an Attic-declension noun (see below)
  • Occasionally, the plural nominative -οι appears as -oe, rather than the typical Latin -ī
  • Nota bene that certain Greek names, like Odysseus, are actually third-declension nouns, which we’ll get to shortly.

For more on second-declension Greek nouns and the Attic declension:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_nouns#Second_declension

The Essential AG: 52