Verbs Taking the Dative OR the Accusative

Verbs Taking the Dative (p4/7)

Verbs Taking the Dative or the Accusative

The following verbs may take either a dative or an accusative, with a variation in meaning

Again, wherever each verb varies from this pattern, I have tried to track down its precise syntax

Cōnsulō, cōnsulere, cōnsuluī, cōnsultum: (d) consult on behalf of, (a) consult

  • They consult for part of the citizens: partī cīvium cōnsulunt.
  • I consulted you: tē cōnsulī.

Metuō, metuere, metuī, metūtum: (d) be anxious for, (a) fear

  • They remain, being anxious for the children: restitērunt metuentēs puerīs.
  • They do not fear the gods: deōs non metuunt.

Timeō, timēre, timuī: (d) be anxious for, (a) fear [sīc metuō]

Prōvideō, prōvidēre, prōvīdī, prōvīsum: (d) to consider, (a) to look toward, foresee

  • Let us consider the father: patriae prōspiciāmus.
  • I look to a seat of security: salūtis sedem prōspiciō.

Caveō, cavēre, cāvī, cautum: (d) to care for oneself, decree, stipulate (a) to guard against

  • Take care of yourself: sibi cavē.
  • The praetor decrees the new law: praetōr novō lēge cavet.
  • Be on guard against the bandits: latrōnēs cavē. 
  • Caveō may also take (ab + abl.), meaning to procure a bail from

Conveniō, convenīre, convēnī, conventum: (d) to suit, be fitting, (a) to meet together

  • It is not fitting for her to do this: hōc facere sibi non convenit.
  • They assembled the soldiers: militēs convēniērunt.

Cupiō, cupere, cupīvī, cupītum: (d) to be fond of, (a) to desire to long for

  • I am fond of the woman: fēminae cupiō.
  • I desire the dog: canem cupiō.
  • Cupiō will rarely take the genitive, and generally in poetry (after the Greek way of doing things)

Īnsistō, īnsistere, īnstitī: (d) to stand in, (a) to tread upon

  • I stand in the fields: agrīs īnsistō.
  • The priests stepped onto the threshold: līmen sacerdōtēs īnsistērunt.

Maneō, manēre, manuī, mansī, mansum: (d) to hold a promise, endure in a state (a) to hold a course, wait for, expect

  • She kept to her promises: prōmissīs suīs manābat.
  • She held the course for three days: trēs dīes viam mansit. 
  • He is expecting his wife: uxōrem manet

Praevertō, praevertere, praevertī, praevertum: (d) to apply oneself to, (a) to anticipate, prevent, preoccupy, outweigh, exceed, be preferable

  • Foremost, they studied astronomy: astronomiae in prīmīs praevertērunt.
  • He thought children preferable to stars: puerōs astra praevertere putāvit.
  • With difficulty, they occupied the fort (before the others): vix castrum praevertābant.

Renuntiō, renuntiāre, renuntiāvī, renuntiātum: (d) to mediate, think, consider [rare], (a) to report back, announce

  • He thought to himself of her pain: dē suō dolōre sibi renuntiābat.
  • They will announce the festival soon: festum mox renuntiābunt.

Solvō, solvere, solvī, solūtum: (d) to pay, (a) to free, release

  • They paid the praetor: praetōrī solvērunt.
  • Caesar released the prisoners: captivās Caesar solvit.
  • Solvō will also take the ablative, meaning to be free from

Succēdo, succēdere, successī, successum: (d) to go under, enter, follow, submit to, (a) to approach, to mount, ascend

  • One soldier followed the another: milēs militī succēdābat. 
  • Let us now climb the mountain: nunc mōntem succēdāmus!

The Essential AG: 365 and n1

Famous Phrase: timeō Danaōs et dōna ferentēs: I fear the Greeks, even bearing gifts

[Aeneid, II.49]

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