(Some [More]) Verbs Taking the Dative

The marathon continues…

Verbs Taking the Dative (p2/many)

Verbs that Command, Obey, Serve, Yield, Resist, Threaten, Pardon or Spare

  • He spares and pardons me: mihi parcit atque īgnōscit.
  • Excuse a father’s grief: īgnōsce patriō dolōrī.
  • I will spare no labor: nōn parcam operae.
  • They resisted Caesar for three days: trēs diēs Caesarī adversī sunt.
  • Let us resist the king: rēgī resistāmus!
  • I will yield only to Cato: solum Catōnī cēdam.
  • You obeyed the laws: legibus pāruistis.
  • He was commanding the soldiers: mīlitibus imperābat. 
  • I ordered the battle lines: aciēbus temperābō.
  • She obstained from cookies: crustulīs temperābat.
  • Some exceptions–iubeō, order, takes an accusative
  • Cēdo may also take the preposition in + acc., where it means ‘to come to’ or ‘turn into’
  • Temperō, where it means ‘to abstain from,’ may take the dative, or the preposition ab + abl.

Indulgeō, indulgēre, indulsī, indultum, yield, allow, favor, indulge, be addicted to

  • This verb fits several of AG’s ‘categories’ and has irregular principal parts––review carefully!
  • He indulged in the new liberties: novīs libertātibus indulsit.
  • I permitted the shouting: clamōribus indulsī.
  • They are forced to yield to the storm: tempestātī indulgēre eīs necesse est.

Verb Summary

  • parcō, parcere, pepercī, parsum: to spare
  • īgnōscō, īgnōscere, īgnōvī, īgnōtum: to forgive
  • adversor, adversārī, adversātus sum: to oppose, resist, withstand
  • resistō, resistere, restitī (no passive): to oppose, resist, withstand
  • cēdō, cēdere, cessī, cessum: to cede, give in, yield to, give way for
  • pāreō, pārēre, pāruī, pāritum: to obey, submit
  • imperō, imperāre, imperāvī, imperātum: to comman, rule, demand, impose
  • temperō, temperāre, temperāvī, temperātum: to moderate, temper, order, govern, manage, control, combine, abstain from
  • indulgeō, indulgēre, indulsī, indultum, to yield, allow, favor, indulge, be addicted to
What About Licet?

The Essential AG: 367

Famous Phrase: minātur innocentibus quī parcit nocentibus

(he threatens the innocent, who spares the guilty)

dative_verbs_1a.pdf

licet_uses.pdf

Permission Consructions

Verbs of Permission

Summary of Construction

“Verbs of permitting take either the subjunctive or the infinitive.” (AG 563c)

Where the subjunctive appears, it accompanies a substantive clause of purpose, led on by ut or .

Verbs of Permitting

All verbs in this list may (among other things) be translated allow or permit

  • ammitto, ammittere, ammīsī, ammissus
  • concēdo, concēdere, concessī, concessus 
  • patior, patī, passus sum
  • permitto, permittere, permīsī, permissus
  • praebeō, praebēre, praebuī, praebitus
  • sinō, sinere, sīvī, situs

Exempla

  • He permitted them to make it: permīsit ut id facerent.
  • I allow you to not miss these events: concēdo tibi nē ea ammittās.
  • He did not allow the tents to be pitched: tabernācula statuī passus nōn est.
  • They do not allow wine to be imported: vinum importārī nōn sinunt.

Note on Licet

The impersonal licet may also mean allow or permit, and may also take an infinite, or initiate a subjunctive purpose clause

The Essential AG: 363c

Famous Phrase: semel in annō licet insanīre

(once each year, it is permitted to go crazy)

[from Horace (4.13.2) and Augustine (Civ. Dei, 4.10); proverbial during the Middle Ages]

permission_construction.pdf

Licet Constructions

Uses of Licet

Summary of Use

licet is an impersonal verb, appearing only “in the third personal singular, the infinitive and the gerund” (AG, 207)

licet takes the dative whenever it governs a finite phrase or clause

licet also offers the dative (or rarely an accusative) to the subject of this phrase

licet may be translated it is allowed, is permitted, may be done

Summary of Forms

Indicative

  • licet / licēbat / licēbit / licuit / licuerat / licuerit

Subjunctive

  • liceat / licēret / licuerit / licuisset

Et Cetera

  • licēre / licuisse / licitum est / licitūrum est / licēns

Basic Uses

Formal

  • No bathing in the fish-pond: lavāre in cētārium nōn licet.
  • They ask that they may do this: rogant ut id sibi facere liceat.
  • You speak as though it were not permitted: loquēris quasi nōn licēret.

Hortatory

  • let all terrors menace me: licet omnēs mihi terrōres impendeat.

this use may have concessive force, appearing where one would expect a concession with ut

  • if concessive, it should be translated ‘though all terrors might menace me’

Review

Licet may take–

  • the simple infinitive
  • the infinitive with accusative subject
  • the infinitive with dative of interest
  • the subjunctive, usually without ut (concessive licet)

The Essential AG: 207, 527

Famous Phrase: videlicet (contraction of videre licet, it is permitted to see)

[further contracted and anglicized as viz. expressing ‘plainly,’ ‘namely,’ or ‘as follows’]

licet_uses.pdf