Imperative-esque Colloquial Phrases

I found these poor guys tossed at the end of the section on imperative mood, but they could all work well for your conversational Latin, so have a look:

All three phrases [cūrā ut; fac / fac ut; velim] make use of the subjunctive mood in a clause, much like the clauses of purpose I’ve been discussing of late.

  • Make sure you’re at Rome: cūrā ut Rōmae sīs
  • Makes sure that you take care of your health: fac ut valētūdinem cūrēs.
  • Be (Remain) at home: facite adsītīs domī.
  • I wish that you would send it to me: eum mihi velim mittās.

These are all great ‘polite imperative’ alternatives to the rather clumsy ‘amābō tē‘ that we’re likely more familiar with.

The Essential AG: 449

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(Some) Verbs Taking the Dative

Allen and Greenough aren’t great here. They have four whole pages on the dative with certain verbs, all of which are poorly structured and organized. I’ve done my best to tie everything together. Some of the verbs are secretly more complex than AG suggests. I’ve tried to note everywhere this is the case.

Here’s one of several forthcoming summaries–

Verbs Taking the Dative (p1/many)

Verbs that Please, Service and Favor

  • It does not displease me: mihi nōn displicet.
  • The poem pleases me: carmen mihi placet.
  • He rescued his fatherland and aided his friend: subvēnit patriae atque amīcō opitulāvit.
  • I do not serve all men: nōn omnibus serviō. 
  • The people favor Septimus: populus Romanus Septimō favet. 
  • Do you favor me or him: mihi aut eō studēs?
  • Some exceptions–iuvō and adiuvō, help, dēficiō, fail, and dēlectō, please, take an accusative
  • N.B. : placet (please) and plācet (placate, sbj.) look incredibly similar, and both take the dative, but are two distinct verbs

Verbs that Persuade, Trust and Believe

  • In this way, I have persuaded myself: sīc mihi persuāsī.
  • She trusts you with her life: ad vītam tibi fīdit.
  • We trust in the household gods: Penatibus credimus.
  • Some exceptions–fīdo and cōnfīdo may take an ablative or a dative
  • Credō is also complicated: taking a dative and accusative where meaning “to entrust or credit x with y,” and frequently taking the preposition “in + acc.” instead of a direct dative

Verb Summary

  • displiceō, displicēre, displicuī, displicitum: to displease
  • placeō, placēre, placuī, placitum: to please
  • opitulor, opitulārī, opitulātus sum: to assist, relieve
  • serviō, servīre, servīvī, (no passive): to serve
  • subveniō, subvenīre, subvēnī, subventum: to assist
  • faveō, favēre, favī, fautum: to favor
  • studeō, studēre, studuī (no passive): to favor, study
  • persuādeō, persuādēre, persuāsī, persuāsum: to persuade, convince
  • fīdo, fīdere, fīsus sum (semi-deponent): to trust
  • cōnfīdo, cōnfidere, cōnfisus sum (semi-deponent): to trust, believe
  • crēdō, crēdere, crēdidī, crēditum: to credit, entrust, believe

The Essential AG: 367

Famous Phrase: equō nē crēdite, Teucrī (don’t trust the horse, Trojans)

Virgil, Aeneid, 2.48-9

dative_verbs_1b.pdf