Imperative of Sciō, Habeō and Meminī

The imperative of sciō is scītō in the singular and scītōte in the future. These are the future forms, but they are used in the present tense.

Even if you’re a whiz and you know that already, it might be a little less where how to use this imperative in a Latin sentence. The Romans don’t appear to have ordered others to do things like ‘know these by heart before Friday’s exam.’ Instead, the imperative of ‘know’ was more often something like ‘rest assured’ or ‘recall,’ confirming or searching for what is already known rather than standing for the imperative ‘learn.’

  • Scītōte vobīs semper deum propitium esse, sī bonīs: Know that the god will always favor you, so long as you are good.
  • Scītō tibi gratiās dābō: trust that I will return the favor.
  • Scītō exemplum tuī patris: recall the example of your father.

This is also true of habeō, where it means understand, and mēminī. 

  • Habētō tibi me nōn irātum esse: realize that I  am not angry with you.
  • Habetōte vostrum finem: know your limits.
  • Mementō ora candentia parentis: recall your mother’s glowing features.

From the examples in Lewis and Short, I cannot be sure, but it appears that the imperatives of sciō will always take a direct object or an infinitive construction, and never the + ablative construction that may appear with other moods of sciō.

The Essential A  & G: 182a.

(Some) Verbs Taking the Dative

Allen and Greenough aren’t great here. They have four whole pages on the dative with certain verbs, all of which are poorly structured and organized. I’ve done my best to tie everything together. Some of the verbs are secretly more complex than AG suggests. I’ve tried to note everywhere this is the case.

Here’s one of several forthcoming summaries–

Verbs Taking the Dative (p1/many)

Verbs that Please, Service and Favor

  • It does not displease me: mihi nōn displicet.
  • The poem pleases me: carmen mihi placet.
  • He rescued his fatherland and aided his friend: subvēnit patriae atque amīcō opitulāvit.
  • I do not serve all men: nōn omnibus serviō. 
  • The people favor Septimus: populus Romanus Septimō favet. 
  • Do you favor me or him: mihi aut eō studēs?
  • Some exceptions–iuvō and adiuvō, help, dēficiō, fail, and dēlectō, please, take an accusative
  • N.B. : placet (please) and plācet (placate, sbj.) look incredibly similar, and both take the dative, but are two distinct verbs

Verbs that Persuade, Trust and Believe

  • In this way, I have persuaded myself: sīc mihi persuāsī.
  • She trusts you with her life: ad vītam tibi fīdit.
  • We trust in the household gods: Penatibus credimus.
  • Some exceptions–fīdo and cōnfīdo may take an ablative or a dative
  • Credō is also complicated: taking a dative and accusative where meaning “to entrust or credit x with y,” and frequently taking the preposition “in + acc.” instead of a direct dative

Verb Summary

  • displiceō, displicēre, displicuī, displicitum: to displease
  • placeō, placēre, placuī, placitum: to please
  • opitulor, opitulārī, opitulātus sum: to assist, relieve
  • serviō, servīre, servīvī, (no passive): to serve
  • subveniō, subvenīre, subvēnī, subventum: to assist
  • faveō, favēre, favī, fautum: to favor
  • studeō, studēre, studuī (no passive): to favor, study
  • persuādeō, persuādēre, persuāsī, persuāsum: to persuade, convince
  • fīdo, fīdere, fīsus sum (semi-deponent): to trust
  • cōnfīdo, cōnfidere, cōnfisus sum (semi-deponent): to trust, believe
  • crēdō, crēdere, crēdidī, crēditum: to credit, entrust, believe

The Essential AG: 367

Famous Phrase: equō nē crēdite, Teucrī (don’t trust the horse, Trojans)

Virgil, Aeneid, 2.48-9

dative_verbs_1b.pdf